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Ron Johnson Ditches His Own Judicial Nominee After 2,323 Days PDF Print E-mail
Elections, Elected Officials, Political Parties
Written by Democratic Party of Wisconsin, Brandon Weathersby   
Wednesday, 18 May 2016 18:03

ron-johnsonMADISON - "What did Johnson have to say? Who knows. He didn’t even show up."

Ron Johnson Ditches His Own Judicial Nominee After Ignoring Court Vacancy For 2,323 Days By Jennifer Bendery
May 18, 2016

Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) just can’t bring himself to play well with others.

He’s spent more than six years — 2,323 days, to be precise — singlehandedly preventing a vacancy on a court that covers his state from being filled. It’s the longest circuit court vacancy in the country.

That’s why it was a big deal Wednesday when the Senate Judiciary Committee held a hearing for Wisconsin lawyer Donald Schott, who would fill that seat on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit. Sen. Tammy Baldwin (D-Wis.), Schott’s other home-state senator, introduced him with rave reviews. A few committee members peppered him with questions, but signaled no problems with his qualifications.

What did Johnson have to say? Who knows. He didn’t even show up.

Typically, both of a nominee’s senators come to these hearings to make the best case possible for confirming the nominee. Schott was one of eight finalists for the seat suggested by the Wisconsin senators’ own commission. And Johnson previously joined Baldwin in turning in their “blue slips” for Schott — a procedural step that signals a senator is ready to advance a nominee in the committee.

A Johnson spokeswoman didn’t respond to a request for comment on why he skipped the hearing or whether he actually plans to push to confirm Schott, versus just turning in his blue slip for appearance’s sake.

At least one Wisconsin senator was eager to introduce a home-state nominee to the Judiciary Committee.

Johnson’s efforts to stall on filling the 7th Circuit seat fit into a broader GOP strategy of blocking nearly all of President Barack Obama’s judicial picks this year. That’s because Republican leaders would prefer to hold out until 2017, when Donald Trump might be in the White House (is this really happening?) and put forward lifetime judicial nominees more to their liking.

The problem is that courts with vacancies can get so swamped that people’s cases are delayed for years even as judges grapple with burnout. There are currently 87 federal court vacancies. Twenty-eight are considered emergencies.

Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa), who chairs the Judiciary Committee, said last week that he expects the Senate to stop any confirmation of judges by the time August hits. That doesn’t bode well for the 7th Circuit, which is positioned to roll into year seven with this vacant seat.

 
Tom Perez to Keynote 2016 Democratic State Convention in Green Bay PDF Print E-mail
Elections, Elected Officials, Political Parties
Written by Democratic Party of Wisconsin   
Wednesday, 18 May 2016 17:35

Tom PerezJoined by State Chair Martha Laning, Senate Democratic Leader Jennifer Shilling, Assembly Democratic Leader Peter Barca, Congressman Ron Kind, Congresswoman Gwen Moore, Congressman Mark Pocan, U.S. Senator Tammy Baldwin, and Russ Feingold


GREEN BAY - Friday and Saturday, June 3 & 4 respectively, labor and civil rights leader Tom Perez will give the keynote addresses at the 2016 Democratic State Convention. State Chair Martha Laning, Senate Democratic Leader Jennifer Shilling, Assembly Democratic Leader Peter Barca, Congressman Ron Kind, Congresswoman Gwen Moore, Congressman Mark Pocan, U.S. Senator Tammy Baldwin, Russ Feingold, and a number of other Democratic leaders will also give remarks.

Members of the Media Attending

A credential is required for members of the media wishing to attend this event. Please click here to apply for a press credential.

All members of your party wishing to attend are required to submit a credential request.

Members of the media who have not submitted a request for credentials and have not been approved for a press credential will not be allowed into the event. Please note that press riser space will be limited.

 
Ron Johnson Confused About the Definitions of Support and Endorse PDF Print E-mail
Elections, Elected Officials, Political Parties
Written by Democratic Party of Wisconsin, Brandon Weathersby   
Wednesday, 18 May 2016 17:24

rjMADISON - While talking about his new pal, Donald Trump, the past few days, Senator Johnson has been confused over the definition of the words "support" vs "endorse." He seems to think that the two words have different meanings, but he’s sadly mistaken. Of course, Wisconsinites know that Sen. Johnson’s word soup is classic Washington Insider doublespeak (cc Sen. Kelly Ayotte). But just to make sure there's no room for error the next time he talks about endorsing...or...supporting The Donald, we took the liberty of sending him a dictionary to clear up any confusion he may have.

The dictionary should arrive at Johnson’s Washington office in the next few days, but here’s a preview:

We highlighted the definition of "endorse" for the senator...

And did the same thing for the word "support..."

We wrote Sen. Johnson a letter along with the dictionary. In case you can’t read it, here’s the text

Dear Senator Johnson,

We heard you on Mike Daly’s Show on Sunday talking about your endorsement...err...support for presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump. You sounded confused about the definitions of the words "support" and "endorse." Here’s a dictionary that should help clear up any confusion you may still have over the difference (hint: there is none). We’ve taken the liberty of highlighting the definitions and synonyms of support and endorse in the dictionary and put them below.

From American Heritage Dictionary

Endorse (p. 252): To express approval of or give support to

Support (p. 728): To aid the cause of by approving or favoring, synonym:               endorse

For future reference when you talk about “supporting” vs. “endorsing” Donald Trump, you should keep in mind that the words are synonyms. There is no difference.

Sincerely,
Democratic Party of Wisconsin

 
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